Too Hot to Handle 10k

Saturday, I ran a 10k in Dallas. In July. In the middle of summer.

Thank goodness I didn’t do the 15k.

I’ve run the Too Hot to Handle race several times, and yes, I pulled my friend Leda along for the ride again. Since I had the injury and training for the tri, I hadn’t done much running. I talked it over with my coach and we decided the 10k was a good option. Honestly, I wasn’t sure how it would go since I’ve only had two runs over 6 miles since April. I’ve been doing plenty of fast running for shorter distances, so I was a little concerned about my internal pacing guide.

But the goal was to have fun.

Still dry at the start! Not really. I was sweating.

Starting temperature was 82 degrees (real feel of 88). I decided to not pay much attention to my Garmin, and use effort (breathing) as my guide since it’s been a while since I last ran a 10k. Apparently, I forgot how to line up in the start corral too. I spent a good half a mile trying to weave my way around runners to settle into my pace. I felt like I was holding back, and that was probably a good thing. The course was an out and back at White Rock Lake.

I did see my mile splits when my Garmin buzzed, but I didn’t really focus on them. I just enjoyed the race. I made it to the U-turn, and was so grateful that I wasn’t running the 15k. I was starting to heat up. At the turn around, I sipped some water and dumped the rest over my head. I was feeling pretty good. Then, the heat started to set in, and I was searching for the next water stop. It was after an incline that felt like a mountain around mile 4 and a half. That’s when I knew I should have carried my bottle with Nuun. I was starting to heat up, so I took one of the cold towels they were handing out and wrung it out over my neck and shoulders. I picked up the pace a bit to make up for my slowdown. The course was mostly shady, but there were some stretches in the sun, and I was hot. I would take walk breaks, long enough to slow my breathing, and then pick up the run pace again. As I came around the last turn, I heard the blip of a siren, and I knew the 15k leader was coming in. I ended up crossing the finish line the same exact time as the 15k winner. I hope I didn’t mess up his finish picture. 😉

After I finished, I was grateful for a cold towel, and then I headed to the Nuun table to rehydrate while I waited for my friend.

Red-faced and drenched in sweat!

I honestly was surprised when I saw my splits for the last two miles. I kept my running fast enough that my walk breaks didn’t destroy my pace. Actually, I was surprised about the splits for miles 2 -3. I felt strong through mile 4 (strength training is paying off) and if I had been smart enough to carry my bottle I probably would have been able to go faster. But a runner is always learning…

 

Did I mention that I was glad I ran the 10k?

Leda was glad we ran the 10k too. 🙂

 

We cooled off and refueled with our post race goodies.

The real reason I run races.

Then, I found out I placed 3rd in my age group, and got a trophy. What?!?

 

 

I like running races year round. They keep me motivated to continue training, and it adds some fun to summer running. This is a well done summer race with plenty of sprinklers, cold towels, and hydration. Next up on my schedule is a local 10k in August. I’ll be more prepared to pace that one.

 

Stay hydrated!

 

 

 

 

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Another Perspective (Volunteering for a Race)

Last week I ran five days and a total of 21 miles. On Thursday, I asked my Airrosti doctor about a long run. I had been running three and four milers. He told me I could run as far as I wanted to as long as there was no sharp or stabbing pain. If that happened, I had to stop immediately.

I headed out with my running friend Saturday morning with a plan to hopefully make it five or six miles. We meet at the park and usually head out for a five mile loop then finish any extra around the park.

This was the result:

A little slower, but I'll take it!

A little slower, but I’ll take it!

By the middle of the sixth mile, my foot started throbbing but once I went home- rolled, stretched, and iced – it was better. I was happy with my distance and it felt good to push my endurance. I’m amazed at how quickly it disappeared. Last fall it was common for me to run 7 miles before work, and now double digits are a distant memory. Actually, it’s only been three weeks since my last half marathon, but it feels so much longer.

After my run, my husband and I headed downtown to the new Farmer’s Market to check it out. I thought it would just be an easy ride there and back. Two hours later, which included a ride to a (not so easy) trail that goes around a small lake, we were back in the driveway and my quads were crying. I could write a whole post just about the ride. I actually muttered the phrase “I can’t.” Instead, here’s a highlight:

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Note all the mud on his tires…and bluebonnets

 

Early Sunday morning I left the house at 4:30 to head to Dallas. I was volunteering for the Skyline Half. I encourage all runners to volunteer for a race – especially a water stop. It will make you appreciate the volunteers so much more once you have experienced it yourself.

They get as little sleep as the runners do.

5:30 am check in!

5:30 am check in!

There is a lot of waiting.

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Then finally some action with a rush of runners. I discovered after yelling out “Gatorade!” forty times, the word sounds really strange. It was a warm day for runners, and since it was down in the river basin it was sticky too. I saw some of my friends from our running group, and they seemed excited to see me. I was also surprised to see some just hang out for a bit before moving on. I typically don’t stop at aid stations unless I’m refilling my hand-held so it was another side of racing I hadn’t seen. There was more waiting as the pack thinned out before the walkers started coming. When the last runner came through, we finished cleaning up. Instead of waiting for the truck to pick us up, we walked back to the start area – which took about 15 minutes. It was also where the closest porta-potties were located (as far as we knew). The finish area was mostly cleared out and there were just a few runners left to come through.

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When I got back to my car, it had been almost 6 hours since I’d had anything to eat. I only drank water as we were walking back. No porta-potties meant no drinking for me. I was hot, gatorade stained, tired, and famished. Oh and my feet hurt. But the best part was that because I was part of a group of volunteers that helped out the Dallas chapter of Back on my Feet, a member was able to get registered and ran his first half marathon that day. I also heard words of thanks and appreciation from runners throughout the morning. It was worth it.

Tell me, have you volunteered for a race? What did you get to do?