Too Hot to Handle 10k

Saturday, I ran a 10k in Dallas. In July. In the middle of summer.

Thank goodness I didn’t do the 15k.

I’ve run the Too Hot to Handle race several times, and yes, I pulled my friend Leda along for the ride again. Since I had the injuryΒ and training for the tri, I hadn’t done much running. I talked it over with my coach and we decided the 10k was a good option. Honestly, I wasn’t sure how it would go since I’ve only had two runs over 6 miles since April. I’ve been doing plenty of fast running for shorter distances, so I was a little concerned about my internal pacing guide.

But the goal was to have fun.

Still dry at the start! Not really. I was sweating.

Starting temperature was 82 degrees (real feel of 88). I decided to not pay much attention to my Garmin, and use effort (breathing) as my guide since it’s been a while since I last ran a 10k. Apparently, I forgot how to line up in the start corral too. I spent a good half a mile trying to weave my way around runners to settle into my pace. I felt like I was holding back, and that was probably a good thing. The course was an out and back at White Rock Lake.

I did see my mile splits when my Garmin buzzed, but I didn’t really focus on them. I just enjoyed the race. I made it to the U-turn, and was so grateful that I wasn’t running the 15k. I was starting to heat up. At the turn around, I sipped some water and dumped the rest over my head. I was feeling pretty good. Then, the heat started to set in, and I was searching for the next water stop. It was after an incline that felt like a mountain around mile 4 and a half. That’s when I knew I should have carried my bottle with Nuun. I was starting to heat up, so I took one of the cold towels they were handing out and wrung it out over my neck and shoulders. I picked up the pace a bit to make up for my slowdown. The course was mostly shady, but there were some stretches in the sun, and I was hot. I would take walk breaks, long enough to slow my breathing, and then pick up the run pace again. As I came around the last turn, I heard the blip of a siren, and I knew the 15k leader was coming in. I ended up crossing the finish line the same exact time as the 15k winner. I hope I didn’t mess up his finish picture. πŸ˜‰

After I finished, I was grateful for a cold towel, and then I headed to the Nuun table to rehydrate while I waited for my friend.

Red-faced and drenched in sweat!

I honestly was surprised when I saw my splits for the last two miles. I kept my running fast enough that my walk breaks didn’t destroy my pace. Actually, I was surprised about the splits for miles 2 -3. I felt strong through mile 4 (strength training is paying off) and if I had been smart enough to carry my bottle I probably would have been able to go faster. But a runner is always learning…

 

Did I mention that I was glad I ran the 10k?

Leda was glad we ran the 10k too. πŸ™‚

 

We cooled off and refueled with our post race goodies.

The real reason I run races.

Then, I found out I placed 3rd in my age group, and got a trophy. What?!?

 

 

I like running races year round. They keep me motivated to continue training, and it adds some fun to summer running. This is a well done summer race with plenty of sprinklers, cold towels, and hydration. Next up on my schedule is a local 10k in August. I’ll be more prepared to pace that one.

 

Stay hydrated!

 

 

 

 

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Craig Ranch Sprint Tri

Sunday, I completed my first triathlon in about two years. Mostly to let my plantar fascia completely heal, but also because I needed a mental break. My coach was on board, and actually encouraged this switch.

The training has been good for me. I’ve seen progress in the pool, and on the bike when I took it out to the roads. I’ve run some shorter distances: track workouts, brick workouts, and haven’t run for more than hour. I was a little nervous earlier in the week, and it was about stuff that’s pretty much out of my control (flat tire, etc…). By the time Saturday rolled around though, I was excited.

I laid out all my gear after my Saturday morning easy workout, and I practiced transition a few times. I had a pretty good handle of going from bike to run (from weekly brick workouts), but I needed to refresh going from swim to bike. Once I was comfortable, I packed everything up and didn’t think about it the rest of the day.

Sunday morning was a little windy and overcast, but still warm. I met my friend Leda there. I’m so glad she lets me talk her into these adventures. We were only able to bike together once – the day before. I also had other friends at the race, including my friend who talked me into doing my first triathlon three years ago (when I was dealing with PF in my other foot).

 

The swim, which used to scare me, was 350 meters in an outdoor pool. I had some trouble in the first lane trying to get around a lady doing the breaststroke. I almost got kicked in the face a few times, and couldn’t get around because of the guys coming up behind/next to me. It was hand to foot combat! πŸ˜‰ After the second length of trying to get by, I was able to make a big push from the wall to get ahead of her. It took me about 200 meters into the swim to get into a rhythm and slow my breathing down. It wasn’t ideal, but I survived.

Out of the pool, I made my way to my bike. Transition went well. The hardest part was running on concrete to get to my bike. My bare feet don’t like hard surfaces!

It takes me a few minutes to get settled in on the bike and feel comfortable. Then I start hydrating with Nuun. My plan was to finish my bottle about 10 minutes before starting the run. The bike was 12 miles. There was a little bit of climbing, but I consider this one of my [few] strengths on the bike. I liked the fact that it was two loops, so I knew what to expect on the second one. I settled into a decent for me speed, and didn’t wear my legs out. The wind was a little tough in places, but nothing like Buffalo Springs!

Back in transition, I swapped out my shoes, grabbed my visor and race number, then headed out to the run. This was my sport! Since my first triathlon, I’ve always looked forward to the run. It was the first time throughout the race that I felt it was hot outside. I settled into my pace, and my plan was to increase speed a little each mile. In the third mile, I picked it up and focused on finishing strong. My first and second miles were around 9:00 pace, and I averaged 8:54 overall for the 5k run. Negative splits. Yay!

I loved the finish area! I got my water and medal, then found my husband. I was able to see my friends after the race too. We had watermelon, pancakes, and Nuun. I was a happy finisher!

 

I had a lot of fun, which was the ultimate goal! I forgot how much I enjoy triathlon (when I’m not worried about swim cutoff times). πŸ™‚ I was mostly pleased with my results. I was hoping to have a better swim time, but I don’t typically time myself jumping in and climbing out either. I was also happy with my overall placings. Usually I’ve been at or near the bottom of my age group. Progress.

 

Now, it’s time to shift back to running. I’ve got a whole 4 days of running this week, and I’m ready! I have some big goals to crush.

 

 

 

Summer Running

We finally made it to the end of the school year, so we are finished with band concerts, banquets, awards, etc, etc…I’ve just been plugging along with my training in the meantime. I raced my second 5k for the year in May, and it was about 20 degrees warmer with much higher humidity than the one in April. I hit the first mile at a pace that kind of scared me, but ended up slowing in the second mile when there was no breeze and the humidity took over. But anyway, I was happy to see my running friends out there, and that my overall pace came down a bit. It was a smaller local 5k, to raise funds for the Denison Animal Welfare Group (DAWG).

Texoma RunnersThere were dogs everywhere and it was fun. I was surprised to see several run with their dogs and place in their age group. One woman ran with two! Maybe Cleo will be ready to run it next year. I know she likes to run, and last week I discovered she likes my Feetures running socks, when she ate one before I realized I dropped it!

Don’t let the cute face fool you!

 

My foot seems to be back to normal. Yay!! All my runs since the Bluebonnet Half have been 5 miles or less, and two to three times a week at most. I’ve been doing some strength work, along with swimming and biking too. I’ve been biking enough that I can’t wait to get back to more running! πŸ™‚

I will say this about triathlon: I like the training, and I feel like a better athlete when I’m training this way. More balanced. Triathlon allows enough respite from running, that my passion for it is rekindled and I will be excited to get back to heavy training. I’m still working on those big goals.

Which brings me to my other news. If you didn’t see my posts earlier this month on social media, I am now an ambassador for RunRelated!

I’ve been working with my coach since mid-December, which means I haven’t had to plan any of my training since then. After more than 7 years of doing it on my own, I am happy to turn that over to someone else. I have some big goals I’m reaching for, and my coach didn’t laugh when I told him what they were. Now, I just need to show up for myself.

Since this is the time of year when a lot of runners are planning for fall/winter races, take a look to see if it’s for you. It’s affordable coaching (you know I’m frugal), it’s specific to me and my goals/schedule, and I can text my coach with questions about workouts, planning races, etc. In the case of my injury, he immediately made changes to the next week’s training to cut the running, and upped the intensity of swimming and biking (more than I would have done on my own). If you’re looking for help meeting your goals, check out RunRelated.

I’m running another local 5k this Saturday to support a marching band. I’m trying to take advantage of this time of year to get in and support the local races. It is getting hot, so my expectations may need to be adjusted. Then, the sprint tri is a few weeks after that. Summer is here!

Stay hydrated!

 

 

 

 

Cowtown Marathon Weekend 2018

After a crazy week of basketball last week (who knew that a playoff tournament for 6th grade basketball was a thing?) I’m finally catching up my blog. It was a busy weekend for the 40th Cowtown Marathon, and I’ve got a lot of info to pack into a post. It may end up looking more like a short story so my apologies, and hang on!

I had big plans going into race week of relaxing, keeping my stress levels down, eating right, and getting extra sleep.

The best laid plans….

It started that Monday, with some stuff going on with one of my kids. I couldn’t do anything about it, except worry. I’m really good at worrying. Then the crazy weather moved in and didn’t leave. A couple of runs were pushed to the treadmill. I can do cold (it was just above freezing) and I can do rain.  But I will not do cold and rain – especially on race week.

The more it rained, the more I worried. We have an area under our home that floods when we get heavy rain, and until we redo the drainage in our yard, I will worry every time it rains. When I worry, I also stress eat. So there’s that. I also had two children sniffling and sneezing all over the place.

Race week was not going well so far.

On Friday, I volunteered at the expo handing out packets. It’s interesting to be on the other side of the racing scene, always giving me a better appreciation of what goes into a race. While I was handing out 5k packets, I had a man ask me a question. The woman next to him jumped in and said, “Well, she’s a volunteer so she wouldn’t know, but I’m a runner. So let me tell you what to do…” Bless her heart!

SATURDAY 5K:

Early Saturday morning, after a night of little sleep, my friend Leda and I headed down to run the 5k as part of the Cowtown Challenge. We took another friend with us, so she could go to the expo and pick up her packet. I’ve never run a Saturday race for Cowtown, and I got pulled in by the fun extras. My dad was running the 10k, and with the weather delay, our races started at the same time.

We got lucky with a break in the weather. The 5k was rain free. I took it nice and easy, just like my coach told me to. We did a few pickups here and there, and ran alongside someone who was doing her first 5k in ten years after having five kids. We encouraged her, and Leda picked up the pace to pull her in to the finish. I watched the 10k winner finish right in front of me, which was humbling – and just like my first 5k. I guess I ran slow enough. I saw my dad after he finished his race, and then we got poured on walking back to the car.

My goal for the rest of the day was rest. I was sleep deprived and emotional from the week, and wasn’t the easiest person to get along with. I tried to take a nap. No dice. I ate an early dinner, and then we left for the Percussion Concert for my son. I enjoyed the concert, but it was 10 p.m. before I got into bed. With a 3 a.m. wakeup the next morning, it wasn’t ideal, but you do what you have to do as a parent. It’s the only time I’ve slept solid all night before a marathon.

SUNDAY RACE DAY:

Race morning was off to a great start! Temps were in the 40s and it was going to be sunny. No rain. Yay! I rode in with running friends and we met up with others from our group.

Texoma Runners take on Cowtown

I made my way over to where RunRelated was meeting for a group picture, and met up with my coach (who was running Cowtown as well).

How did I feel?

Tired, but ready. I didn’t have time to obsess over the race due to the craziness of the week. But I did try to spend some time visualizing my goal. I had “carbed up” more than I did for Dallas (wanted to avoid medical this time) and was well hydrated. I just hoped I didn’t swing the pendulum too far the other direction.

It was time to take on 26.2

The three of us who have been training together started together. We had planned to run the first half together.

Photo credit: Brian Luenser (sent to me by Kevin Whitley on twitter)

After the third mile, I noticed my friends pulling ahead and my pace was right where I was supposed to be. I knew if I ran faster than I was supposed to, I would pay for it later. I had a plan to follow. Nothing faster than 9:45 in the first half. So I held back and ran my own race.

I made my way up the monster hill that so many hate at mile 9. Strong and steady, still feeling like I was holding back. That had to be a good sign! I was still watching my splits, and I only dipped under once with a 9:36.

After the split and a turn, I heard a runner behind me yell, “Is this whole city uphill?” I laughed, because I knew there were more to come.

At mile 20, I still felt strong, and was just over 10:00 pace. I had refilled my bottle a few times at aid stations, dropping Nuun in as I went. My Garmin was set to only show my current mile. I had no idea how what my total time was. My splits were off from the mile markers though, and I was running a half mile over so far.

Then at mile 21, I went up a hill and a turn to go up another one. At the top, I couldn’t recover my breathing. My energy level was zapped, and my pace dropped. But I was still running.

At mile 24, one of my friends who ran the half, came alongside me for over a mile, encouraging me. I told her to go on back and run with the other two, that I would be fine. She said, “No, I’m going to take you to the corner first” and that’s exactly what she did.

When I came around to the finish, I was reminded again of why I love this race. You have people cheering on both sides of the fencing, and the announcer calls out your name. I always see someone I recognize when I’m finishing. I was also impressed with the medical team. One stepped up to walk alongside me. “Are you okay?” I nodded. “I’m good.” Then he stepped off and another one picked up to walk with me. “Really, I’m fine.”

Then I saw my coach and for the first time, I switched screens on my Garmin to see my overall time. 4:35. My initial reaction was disappointment, but then I thought about how I felt through the race: how strong I felt at mile 20, how I probably needed more calories for the last 10k, how I ran up ALL the hills. I also thought about how I felt during Dallas (starting at mile 14) and just feeling defeated for the last 10 miles as I plodded through that race. Then my trip to medical after I finished…

I didn’t feel that way this time, and even though I didn’t hit my time goal, I feel like I ran a strong race. I didn’t fall apart at mile 16 like I have for my last 3 marathons, and I ran a little faster – and a lot smarter – than I did at Cowtown last year. I’m working my way back, baby! One step at a time.

Huge thanks to my coach Tim with RunRelated!


Cowtown Challenge and my 17th marathon finish!

I’m also super proud of my running friends. The one in the middle ran her first full marathon at Cowtown, and Leda had hurt her knee after Hot Chocolate, missing almost two weeks of training. We weren’t even sure she was going to make it to Cowtown. I’m so thankful I have them to run with. πŸ™‚

Marathoners!

If you made it this far in the post, thank you for taking the time to read this. I am grateful I had the opportunity to serve as an ambassador for Cowtown. I look forward to returning next year to complete my medal series. It’ll be the full marathon again. You know, so they all match.

 

 

 

 

Hot Chocolate 15k 2018

This past Saturday, I ran my second Hot Chocolate 15k in Dallas. I regretted not running it last year, but I had cut back on my races for several reasons. This year so many of my friends were going, I wasn’t going to miss it! So I made sure I registered early to get the most for my money.

The only drawback to running a 15k race three weeks before Cowtown, was how to get the long run done. My coach gave me two options, since this was the 20 miler week. We decided to do the Saturday race and a Sunday long/tempo run to simulate the running on fatigued legs.

More on that later.

The weather was great on Saturday, temperature wise. It was a little on the windy side, but the sun was out and that helped. My friends from my running group made fun of me in my shorts. I had brought my capris just in case, but with temperatures in the 40s I knew shorts were best for me even with the wind.

We warmed up – leg swings, lunges – and made our way to the corral. When the race started, I smiled as we all spaced out into our individual speeds. I could see a couple of my friends ahead of me, but I was not going to try to stay with them. I was following my coach’s advice of running a smart race. 9.3 miles is a long way to go if you blow it all in the first half. Plus, there were hills coming.

I did feel like I was holding back for about the first three miles. I kept a check on my pace periodically, but didn’t obsessively check my Garmin. I ran the first mile in 8:42 and that felt good. I went into my usual mode of thanking volunteers and officers (so many police officers) and I was happy to hear so many other runners around me thanking them as well. Grateful is the best attitude to have when running. The race had Nuun on course, but I was carrying my bottle with Lime Energy so I wouldn’t need to stop.

I focused on effort going up the hills, while trying to keep my pace under 9:00. I knew I wasn’t going to PR, because that’s not where I am in my journey, but I wanted to run a strong, solid race and gauge progress. By mile 7, I was so glad I was almost done. It’s funny how 2 miles seems like a short way now.

I would check distance on my watch, but rarely look at the pace. I was in all out effort mode. Somewhere in the last mile, we made a turn into the wind and went up a nice big hill. Then it became all about the chocolate.

I told myself “don’t step off the coals now!”Β  I had set a time goal of under 1:23:00 and it looked like I was going to make it! I powered up the big hill, made a turn, and another turn, and then I was crossing the finish!

I was excited with my time, but mostly because I knew I ran hard and didn’t give up on myself. I said I was done settling, and this race helped solidify that mindset.

Of course my Garmin had a faster pace because of the 9.44 distance…

 

I heard my name, and was looking around for the friends I knew finished before me, but it was Leda who finished just seconds behind me. She ran a slower beginning and negative split her second half. She almost caught me!

Then I saw Chris (fellow Cowtown ambassador) at the finish. He set a pretty great PR!

All of us from our group finished within a few minutes of each other, so we headed over to get our finisher mugs, and enjoyed the treats while we recapped the race. That was a lot of fun, and the chocolate was worth that final push up the hill.

And since there’s a big marathon coming up at the end of this month, I ran 10 miles on Sunday with some marathon pace in the second half. Once I got a few miles in, the soreness from the 15k worked itself out, and I felt decent. Tired, but manageable.

I feel like I’m in a much better place this year mentally and physically, than I was a year ago when my running legs went MIA.Β Β CowtownΒ weekend is in just two weeks, and it’s going to be great!

Kicking off 2018 and Some Cowtown Training

It’s been a while since I updated my blog, and I wanted to do a year end post like have in the past. But honestly, I was kind of frustrated with my 2017 year of running. I spent the first half of the year trying to figure out why my “speed” was missing, and working to bring it back. The second half of the year was almost all training for the Dallas Marathon. My biggest win of the year (in my mind) was getting Rock ‘n Roll San Antonio under 2 hours. But at least I felt like I didn’t lose any more ground. My shorter distance times are mostly the same they were a year ago, and that’s okay. On a positive note, I replaced the battery in my scale the week after Dallas and I had lost 3 pounds! That never happens while marathon training, and I really think it was the SAM (strength and mobility) work done as part of the Simple Marathon Training. I am definitely keeping that up.

After Dallas, I took a bit of recovery time, and then it was time to get to work for Cowtown.

I won an Instagram contest for a free month of coaching from RunRelated. Hiring a coach is something I’ve talked about with my husband for a while, so this was a great opportunity to see how it would go. I decided to continue with my coach after my month was up, because what I’ve been doing isn’t working for me anymore. It’s nice not worrying about what workout to do, or what the long run should be. I just check the schedule and go do it.

The major challenge for Cowtown training lately though has been winter.Β  We have had so many below freezing days this year in Texas. I did a track workout in 16 degrees one morning, and was surprised when the buff I used to cover my mouth and nose came off in a frozen block. My Nuun bottle also froze! Rookie. Lesson learned. On a positive note though, I nailed those 800s! πŸ™‚

Then on January 13, I ran my coldest race to date. It was the Resolution Run half marathon in McKinney. A smaller race to give me a little motivation to start my year. My goal was to run under two hours again, because this will be the year of the sub 2 half marathons. The temperature on race morning was below freezing and it was windy which brought real feel temps into the teens. Brrr! We hung out in the car as long as we could, because the start was right by the parking. Love small races! I wore two long sleeve tops under a jacket, my long pants, CEP knee high socks, my buff, fleece headband, fleece mittens and hand warmers. I have never worn so much gear!

It was an out and back course, and I felt good starting off so the first few miles were a little faster than they should’ve been. Plus we were running into the wind. Dang it. But I did begin to warm up, and started to remove gear when we turned out of the wind. The buff went in one pants pocket, hand warmers in the other. I even took my mittens off for a bit and considered ditching my jacket at a water stop. I met another one of the Cowtown race ambassadors during the race, and we all ran together for a few miles chatting about Cowtown. That was fun.We were behind the 2 hour pace group, and I kept them in my sights planning to catch them in the final miles.

Then we made the turn around to come back, and I was glad I didn’t ditch my jacket. I was doing good to hold onto my pace, keeping my miles right around 9:00.

The plan was to run as hard as I could for the last 5k, but I couldn’t find another gear. I stopped looking at my pace and focused on catching the next person in front of me. I tried to reel in the pace group. They weren’t getting farther away, so I knew I was at least on target. Also, there were a couple of floaters (pacers) who were running along encouraging us at different points. It was nice to have someone alongside me telling me to keep it up, because it was getting hard. At one point I was seriously ready to chunk my heart rate monitor in the grass. It felt tight around my chest, even though it wasn’t. I was so glad to see that finish line, because I was ready to get out of the cold!

 

I met my time goal – barely. But I am okay with that, because I was probably carrying about 10 lbs of gear that I don’t normally run with. Plus, when I took my jacket off to put on dry clothes, my layers were soaked in sweat.

 

Last week’s training wasn’t any warmer. The temperatures hit the point that I had to go shopping for better gear. I went to TJ Maxx and found some fleece lined tights to wear under my pants, and a warmer fleece lined jacket that wasn’t bulky. I got to try it out at the track on Wednesday, and it was a better layering combo than what I wore in the race. I would rather run outside if I can. For the amount of money I spent, I won’t be too mad if I only wear them a couple of times a year. πŸ™‚

Thankfully for Saturday’s long run, temps were in the 50s. I was in shorts and short sleeves, and my visor! I was happy, because I’m just over sub-freezing weather. I felt so much lighter without all that extra clothing, and the sun was out! My legs felt good, and even though my stomach didn’t quite cooperate, I had a good day.

This week is a recovery week, and I’m going to take advantage of the extra rest. Recovery weeks are my favorite!

Quick question: What’s the coldest race you’ve ever run? Do you try to train outside when the temperature drops?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dallas Training Continues

This past week wrapped up week 7 of 20 for Dallas Marathon training. It’s been a pretty good couple of weeks.

We had one of our largest Saturday groups (in week 6) that I’ve seen in the 5 years I’ve been a part of Texoma Runners:

A decent 16 mile run with some nice weather:

Week 7 included

a #RunforTexas 10k for Harvey relief:

A second 16 mile run with a good-sized group surrounding us the whole time:


 

It was nice to have so many with us as we went into the double digits, since usually it’s just my friend and I finishing our long run by ourselves (during marathon training). Because of the way this run worked out, we had an early group and a later group keep us company. πŸ™‚ The weather was absolutely wonderful for an early September run in Texas. We also had another runner join us for all of both 16 milers, as she is prepping for her first half next week. I think she’ll be ready.

I have been working on my fueling for long runs, and it looks like Ucan is going to be my go-to. I used it the last two weeks, as well as a few other times, and it seems to be working well. I also supplement my hydration/electrolytes with Nuun of course.

This coming Saturday is a local 5k. I would say it’s the biggest one all year. We have tried to figure out how we’re going to work in our 18 miler, but it looks like we’re going to abbreviate it and run the 5k in there somewhere. It won’t be the fastest I can run, but I need to look at the big picture. Marathon.